Out50

  • A lot of people in South Florida know Theo Smith. And a lot know him by his moniker, “The Gay Mayor of West Palm Beach.” In his 43 years on the planet, Smith has wracked up some wide recognition as a doer — especially when it comes to helping gay institutions.

  • There’s a strong likelihood you’ve heard Tom Hantzarides. Maybe not by name, but most definitely his voice.

  • With her lifelong work as a special education teacher, her success establishing Gay-Straight Alliances in K-12 Chicago schools from 1995-2003, and her laundry list of accolades, you’d think Toni Armstrong Jr. would come to Palm Beach to take a break. But with the success of BLAST, you probably understand why she hasn’t stopped.

  • South Florida audiences know Fort Lauderdale resident Tony Finstrom for his award-winning plays. His most recent works have headlined at Jan McArt’s New Play Reading Series at Lynn University in Boca Raton and the Broward Stage Door Theatre in Coral Springs.

  • When Tony Lima was hired last summer to be the Executive Director of SAVE Dade, Board Chairman Brian Adler declared that “he brings talent, enthusiasm and passion to his new role and will represent the LGBT community in Miami with distinction.”

  • SunServe is preparing to announce its new executive director, and SFGN can confirm that Tony Lima is taking the position. Lima is a familiar face to the South Florida LGBT non-profit community. 

  • It was through activism and work at Compass that brought together Tony Plakas and Jamie Foreman, who have been together since November 1997 and married since 2011.

  • In March and April an attorney representing the state sounded confident he’d be able to reach a plea deal with the four men accused of attacking a gay couple after Miami Beach Pride in 2018 before the next court hearing in August. 

  • My legendary friend, Elaine Noble, the first openly gay person elected to a State House (1974), was quoted this morning in a coffee discussion with two friends on the challenges facing some older gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender people today.

  • Vanessa Brito knows Miami politics inside and out. She is the Director and Owner of MYami Marketing Inc., a Miami based full-service Political Consulting firm. Brito is a contributing expert writer to Miami.com and Miami.com en Español as well as AMBIENTE Magazine on issues related to the LGBT community, committee member to SAVE’s Foundation’s Communications and Marketing Committee, Federal Club member of the Human Rights Campaign, and advisory board member to the Latin Gay and Lesbian Film Festival.

  • At 43, Velvet Lenore has been doing drag for almost half her life. “I started 21 years ago,” she says proudly. “And I’ve never come out in the traditional sense,” she continued anticipating the next question.

  • For Victor Diaz-Herman, he’s been an equal rights activist since birth.

  • Victoria Sigler is a judge of the Miami-Dade County Circuit court. Sigler became the first “out” political figure to win office in Florida with her campaign for County Court Judge in 1994. She was most recently re-elected without opposition last year – her current six-year term expires in January 2021. And her accomplishments don’t end there.

  • Last week, in a region of the country experiencing a sharp rise in extremist activity, a Washington man was sent to prison for nearly 20 years for the brutal murder of a transgender girl.

  • Sometimes people ask me if there is still a need for gay media, with how mainstream the LGBT community has become. When you flip through these pages you’ll see why there’s still that need.

  • You can tell that Will Spencer, Vice President of Kids in Distress, really has a passion for what he does. As he described what the organization does as well as his various duties, I heard the smile in his voice.

  • Father Bill Collins began ministering to people living with HIV/AIDS in 1985 when he was appointed Chaplain to Imperial Point Hospital where he began his local ministry of service to people living with the virus. Two years later he founded The Poverello Food Bank and Thrift Shop. It opened in Pompano in the summer of 1987 and was only 1,800 square feet big. It’s mission: to help provide unavailable necessities to the growing number of men, women and children testing positive for the virus. Now almost 27 years later, Father Bill is 83 and still working. You can see him writing in the Poverello newsletters.

  • William Green, Broward County Health Care Services Administrator, has been with the county for 13 years working with disenfranchised communities and ensuring that they have equitable access to healthcare.