LGBT rights

  • As expected, following the recent decision by the Supreme Court to legalize gay marriage nationwide, the same sex wedding market has exploded. A report from the Williams Institute, a national think tank at the UCLA School of Law, estimates that 24,248 same-sex couples will marry in Florida during the first three years it is legal. Those weddings, according to the report, would generate $182.2 million to the state and local economy and create between 875 and 2,626 jobs in the tourism and recreation sector.

  • After Charlotte’s failed vote on LGBT ordinances, attention and debate turns to transgender inclusion, community education and fall election.

  • Organizers promise an even better festival next year

  • Both politicians come out swinging in favor of LGBT rights

  • Both politicians come out swinging in favor of LGBT rights

  • …and why the LGBT community should care

  • (WB) Transgender people have additional protections from discrimination under federal law for having a disability if they experience gender dysphoria, the U.S. Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Tuesday in a consequential decision that marks a first for a federal appeals court.

  • Around the country Democrats lost big on election night and there was no exception in Florida where openly gay democrat Joe Saunders lost his state house seat and Republicans gained a super majority in the state house. And then of course there is the re-election of Rick Scott for governor and Pam Bondi for attorney general, both of whom continue to oppose marriage equality.

  • WASHINGTON (CNN) -- Republican front-runner Donald Trump said Friday that he wished a Kentucky county clerk, Kim Davis, was not jailed for refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples, but he added that the Supreme Court has ruled and it is "the law of the land."

  • It's been a whirlwind watching Donald Trump make a bid for the White House next year - everything from his speeches at the epic 2016 GOP Presidential debate last week has been truly fascinating. But The Donald's latest remarks, regarding the LGBT community, have been pretty interesting. When the businessman and former reality star stopped by "Meet the Press" last weekend, he said he supports nondiscrimination protections of gay works, saying no one should be fired because of their sexuality.

  • It's been a whirlwind watching Donald Trump make a bid for the White House next year - everything from his speeches at the epic 2016 GOP Presidential debate last week has been truly fascinating. But The Donald's latest remarks, regarding the LGBT community, have been pretty interesting. When the businessman and former reality star stopped by "Meet the Press" last weekend, he said he supports nondiscrimination protections of gay works, saying no one should be fired because of their sexuality.

  • BANGKOK (AP) — Gay rights activists are welcoming a clause in a draft of Thailand's new constitution that is aimed at protecting the rights of gay and transgender people.

  • BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Gov.-elect John Bel Edwards says he'll issue an executive order when he takes office in January that bans discrimination in state government based on sexual orientation.

  • (WM) A ballot drive has turned in more than 483,000 signatures for an initiative to prohibit discrimination against LGBT people in Michigan by amending the state’s civil rights law.

  • After Russian pranksters pulled a fast one on Sir Elton John, pretending to be Russian President Vladimir Putin in a hoax phone call, the singer said he is currently working out a date to meet the Soviet leader in order to discuss gay rights, the BBC reports.

  • (WB) Equality Virginia on Tuesday discussed proposed guidelines for transgender rights in schools during a virtual town hall that guided participants through crafting public comments in support of the guidelines which solidify protections for trans students and school staff.

  • DALLAS (AP) — Former college football television analyst Craig James on Monday filed a religious discrimination lawsuit against Fox Sports that contends he was fired because he had expressed opposition to gay marriage during a failed run for the U.S. Senate.

  • LAGOS, Nigeria (AP) — Bisi Alimi has been assaulted and persecuted and fled into exile, all because he is gay. Now, he's speaking out about his travails to persuade British legislators to engage Nigerian policy makers about a law that makes even befriending a homosexual a crime punishable by 10 years in jail.

  • SFGN’s “Speak OUT” is a weekly feature giving a regular voice to South Florida LGBT leaders. This week the LGBT community lost big in Houston with the repeal of the Houston Equal Rights Ordinance (HERO). Is there anything that could or should been done differently? What lessons can be learned from this defeat?

  • The White House hosted its first ever forum to expand the rights of LGBT people around the world.

  • A Miami civil rights lawyer hopes his client — a butch lesbian evicted from her rental at a North Bay Village condominium — is among the first vindicated through a recent decision by the Florida Commission on Human Relations.

  • (WM) Among transgender-rights activists, there’s a powerful mix of hope and fear heading toward the Nov. 3 election. They’re yearning for President Donald Trump’s defeat but dreading the possibility that his administration might win four more years and continue targeting them with hostile policies.

  • INDIANAPOLIS —The former head of Angie's List announced Thursday that he's formed a new tech industry coalition that will join a growing list of groups that are ratcheting up pressure on Indiana's Republican-dominated government to approve civil rights protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered people.

  • The City of Fort Lauderdale joined an amicus brief calling for a rehearing on the issue of youth conversion therapy.

  • Heather Moraitis is known for being the conservative voice on the Fort Lauderdale City Commission. But despite the vice mayor’s ideology she’s often voted with the LGBT community — most notably in 2019 when she voted in favor of banning discrimination against LGBT people in employment, housing and public accommodations in the city.

  • Was it a “significant” victory for LGBT people or another sign of “death by a thousand cuts” for LGBT equal rights? Was it an “important win for religious liberty” or a “failure”?

  • INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The CEO of a massive gamers' convention that threatened to leave Indiana earlier this year over a divisive religious objections law said Thursday that organizers are "shopping the show" to other cities and could relocate if lawmakers don't expand protections for gays and lesbians.

  • WASHINGTON (AP) — Emily Smith and Jillian Levine had already chosen a venue, booked a band and written the first draft of the ceremony for their wedding when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that gay couples nationwide have a right to marry. Within minutes of the June 26 ruling, Levine texted her fiancée a rainbow emoji and a question about their ceremony.

  • LE MARAIS – PARIS’ GAY DISTRICT

    For the last several years, a revolution has come up in the peaceful elegant and bourgeois Parisian sky. Paris, which is the world’s most visited city has become one of the world’s most gay city as well and the first capital to elect an openly gay mayor in March 2001, Bertrand Delanoë re-elected with 57 percent of the votes in march 2008.

  • NEW DELHI (AP) — Hundreds of gay rights activists danced to drum beats and held colorful balloons as they marched in a parade in New Delhi, celebrating what they call the diversity of gender and sexuality.