equality

  • The White House is preparing an executive order offering transgender federal workers formal protection from discrimination at work, President Barack Obama announced Monday.

  • LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — Nebraska welfare officials have been placing foster children in the homes of gay, lesbian and unmarried couples since before Gov. Pete Ricketts took office in January, despite a 1995 policy barring the state from doing so, the governor's spokesman said Monday.

  • Proposed legislation would allow same-sex couples in Ohio to file joint state tax returns in line with a U.S. Supreme Court decision that permits such couples to jointly file federal taxes.

  • COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) - A member of the State Board of Education says she wants to amend Ohio public schools' operating policies to prohibit employment discrimination based on sexual orientation.

  • One Million Moms (OMM), the media watchdog arm of the anti-gay hate group American Family Association reached a new low today when they referred to Jazz Jennings, the transgender teen who is the star of the TLC reality series "I Am Jazz," as someone's "mistake."

  • NEW YORK (CNNMoney) -- It's been one year since the Supreme Court's monumental ruling on same-sex marriage, and many couples have already seen their lives change dramatically.

  • As America closes a month of gay pride celebrations, international LGBT rights are still in the Dark Ages in very bright places. We can start with Uganda.

    Thanks to a technological communications revolution, the world is a much smaller place. We witness Iraqi executions on cell phones, and the Internet takes us across the globe in seconds. What happens a continent away is on our laptop seconds later. We can’t look the other way and play pretend.

    There are places where the gay community still needs to be heard. One of those is at East 42nd Street on First Avenue in New York City, by the East River. It is called United Nations Plaza.

    As a representative of the nation’s gay press, the South Florida Gay News today condemns and censures the United Nations for permitting Uganda’s Sam Kutesa to be selected as the new head of the UN General Assembly. It’s a damn, shocking, shame.

    Given that 81 countries on this globe still outlaw homosexuality, it’s easy to see why being Ugandan would not automatically disqualify him from such a prestigious post. Still, given that the head of the General Assembly represents all countries, it’s a position that the LGBT community should care enough about to be heard.

    It has been estimated that there are nearly 500,000 men and women in the Ugandan gay community. They have absolutely no legal protections. Both male and female homosexuality is illegal. Torture and executions have occurred, and authorities have looked the other way. It is not a gay friendly place to be. Many places in Africa are not, and that is precisely why the African delegation had no problem choosing Kutesa.

    A special shout out is warranted for HBO’s new host, John Oliver, for his feature last weekend on just how backward Uganda really is. More importantly, Oliver re-publicized and documented how American religious zealots have generated anti-gay bigotry in Uganda. Yes, evangelicals like Scott Lively have even testified before Uganda’s parliament, calling for a hard line on homosexuality.

    As Oliver notes, “This means that Africa isn’t just where we send our losing team’s Super Bowl shirts, it’s also now where we send our losing political philosophies.”

    As we celebrate American independence this weekend, thankfully we are also celebrating marriage equality in dozens of states. In our America, we have seen sodomy laws fall and gay communities rise.

    America’s LGBT communities are growing exponentially in number and size, in power and strength. We are open, we are out, and we are proud. We are heard, and we have a place at the table. Our name is called in NFL drafts, and can be selected for U.S. District court judicial appointments. We can be proud of who we are. But we should never be comfortable breathing air in a world that is not universally free.

    Homophobia is a fear which breeds hate. We have gone a long way to ending it here at home. We have seen our share of martyrs, from Harvey Milk to Matthew Shepherd. In other countries, darker places, martyrs are still being made. Let’s do what we can while we are here to bring them the independence and freedom we now cherish everyday.

    Let the United Nations General Assembly know that we say ‘NO’ to an anti gay leader as their spokesperson. Let’s start an international petition right here in South Florida. Why not?

    Today, July 2, 2014, is the fiftieth anniversary of the Civil Rights Act. It was a law that came about one hundred years after Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation freed American slaves. The Civil War brought an end to slavery, but not discrimination. It took years. It does still. Let’s issue our own proclamation against hate, starting here, starting now.

    Our brutal world still needs taming. Terrorists abduct children in Nigeria, slaughter innocents in Syria, and execute gays in Uganda. In Eastern Europe, LGBT brothers and sisters are still persecuted by churches and governments like Russia foster hate rather than hope.

    Let’s not forget that Stonewall was a riot, not a street party for boy dancers on floats. It was an assertion that gays and lesbians would not settle into second-class citizenry. It was a statement that we would stand up and be counted. It was our Rosa Parks moment, but we are not done yet. We still have work to do at home.

    Here in America, teenagers are still bullied. ENDA has not got through Congress. LGBT employees do not have equal rights in hundreds of communities, and Neanderthal city commissioners, like the Mayor of Fort Lauderdale, still oppose marriage equality.

    Stonewall is not over, and July 4 is not for everyone, just yet. But we have the world at our fingertips, and we can let everyone from Fort Lauderdale city commissioners to global leaders in world assemblies know that our voices can and will be heard.

    Stand up and be counted.

  • HOUSTON (AP) - Opponents of Houston's new protections for gay and transgender residents have sued the city after failing to collect enough votes for a repeal referendum.

  • Oral arguments were held last month in the case of a Pittsburgh man who’s seeking to extend his workplace benefits to his same-sex partner.

  • In its 20th year, a national organization created an LGBT Healthcare Bill of Rights for a further understanding of both patients and their providers.

  • PHILADELPHIA — A United Methodist pastor from central Pennsylvania who was defrocked after officiating his son’s gay wedding was invited by a California Methodist bishop to serve in her region in yet another sign of a split in the nation’s largest mainline Protestant denomination.

  • According to televangelist Pat Robertson, gays, who once only inspired the Almighty to smite the earth with natural disasters and the occasional terrorist attack, have diversified their portfolio to include the destruction of financial markets.

  • WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi says that even if reports of high-pressure management techniques at Amazon are true, "they won't be taking place anymore."

  • WASHINGTON (AP) — House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi says that even if reports of high-pressure management techniques at Amazon are true, "they won't be taking place anymore."

  • The City of Pembroke Pines has scheduled the first public reading for an ordinance that would extend domestic partner benefits to city employees.

  • The effort to ban LGBT discrimination made its way back to the state legislature this week, under a new moniker.

  • Pensacola’s City Council is pressing pause on an anti-discrimination ordinance.

  • HONOLULU (AP) — Equality Hawaii Action Fund has endorsed Gov. Neil Abercrombie for governor and Sen. Clayton Hee for lieutenant governor.

  • Ten years ago this week, the odious policy known as “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” (DADT) came to an end.

  • Is Publix a great company or an out-of-date entity?

    The Supermarket giant, headquartered in Lakeland, Fla., has come under fire for how it treats its LGBT employees.

  • A Puerto Rico attorney who married her longtime partner on the U.S. mainland has filed a federal lawsuit seeking to have their marriage recognized in her home territory.

  • Various pastors along with several hundred people gathered outside Houston City Hall to protest a proposed ordinance that would expand anti-bias protections for gay and transgender residents.

  • World Wrestling Entertainment cut ties with now-disgraced wrestling legend Hulk Hogan after a sex tape from 2006 surfaced, showing the athlete using racist langue. Now, RadarOnline reports the personality also used gay slurs in the same video.

  • HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A new Connecticut Supreme Court ruling is adding to the debate on whether gay marriage rights should be applied retroactively and qualify same-sex couples for rights and benefits for which they weren't entitled before state laws allowed them to marry.

  • SAGINAW, Mich. (AP) — A proposed ordinance in Saginaw would guarantee city residents and visitors equal treatment in employment and public accommodations, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity.

  • It takes two to tango - but does a same-sex couple qualify?

  • Sarasota – On Nov. 3, the City of Sarasota unanimously approved on the first reading changes to the city’s anti-discrimination law which would add rights and protections for transgender individuals.

  • PAPILLION, Neb. (AP) — Sarpy County commissioners have decided to extend health insurance benefits to spouses of gay county employees who have legally married in another state but live in Nebraska.

  • Awards ceremonies are still important — even during the coronavirus crisis. Most of us still need some inspiration. You can find some during SAVE’s 2020 Champions of Equality virtual gala. It’s happening this Friday, Aug. 28, at 7 p.m. 

  • COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) - Attempts by state legislators to cut university funding over controversial plays and books are causing a backlash on South Carolina campuses.