Drama

  • From the moment Nicole Kidman first appears onscreen as Lucille Ball in “Being the Ricardos” (Amazon Studios), it’s clear that writer/director Aaron Sorkin loves Lucy (although he must not have seen her in the movie version of “Mame”).

  • Over the course of his lengthy career, Kenneth Branagh has been nominated for five Academy Awards, including once for Best Director for 1990’s “Henry V.”

  • Chances are that neither the real 17th-century French writer Cyrano de Bergerac nor the “Cyrano de Bergerac” created by 19th-century playwright Edmond Rostand could have imagined the way that movie audiences would embrace the story.

  • Can you imagine what it was like for audiences in 1959 to watch Billy Wilder’s Oscar-winning classic comedy “Some Like It Hot” (KL Studio Classics/MGM), newly reissued on 4K Ultra HD + Special Features Blu-ray?

  • Terry Teachout is the powerful theater critic for the Wall Street Journal. His reviews often can make or break a new show, boosting ticket sales or sending down the final curtain.

  • I’ll never forget the time a straight colleague warned me, “Be careful what you wish for because someday you’ll just be another disenfranchised white guy,” clearly speaking to the LGBT community’s battle for civil rights. 

  • It’s been a dozen years since the world was introduced to the Crawley family, the fictional British nobles who call Downton Abbey home, and their colorful cast of servants. 

  • Former gay porn star Johnny Hazzard co-stars in gay family drama

  • A Nance, according to theatrical terminology of the 1930s, is a stock character meant to represent the stereotype of the “effeminate homosexual.” In Douglas Carter Beane's acclaimed new play “The Nance,” out gay actor Nathan Lane plays Chauncey Miles, who plays a variety of nance characters in a low rent burlesque house in late 1930s New York City. Chauncey is tired — he yearns for a more serious acting career. He's alone, lonely and embittered.

  • A movie about a wisecracking grandma and her teen granddaughter, racing around in a beat-up car to find $600 by nightfall. You might think it sounds like any number of mediocre road comedies out there, full of trite generational gags and sporting a sappy, all-is-forgiven ending.