Drama

  • With echoes of Edward Albee’s “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf” and Jordan Peele’s “Get Out,” gay filmmaker Myles Yaksich’s “Albatross” (Freestyle) never really soars, but that’s not for lack of trying.

  • From the moment Nicole Kidman first appears onscreen as Lucille Ball in “Being the Ricardos” (Amazon Studios), it’s clear that writer/director Aaron Sorkin loves Lucy (although he must not have seen her in the movie version of “Mame”).

  • Over the course of his lengthy career, Kenneth Branagh has been nominated for five Academy Awards, including once for Best Director for 1990’s “Henry V.”

  • Chances are that neither the real 17th-century French writer Cyrano de Bergerac nor the “Cyrano de Bergerac” created by 19th-century playwright Edmond Rostand could have imagined the way that movie audiences would embrace the story.

  • Over the course of the last several years, filmmakers have been finding inspiration in the work of Jane Austen.

  • What do you get when you pair up two of gay filmmakers Pedro Almodóvar’s biggest stars – Antonio Banderas and Penélope Cruz – with Argentine filmmaking duo Mariano Cohn and Gastón Duprat?

  • Can you imagine what it was like for audiences in 1959 to watch Billy Wilder’s Oscar-winning classic comedy “Some Like It Hot” (KL Studio Classics/MGM), newly reissued on 4K Ultra HD + Special Features Blu-ray?

  • Terry Teachout is the powerful theater critic for the Wall Street Journal. His reviews often can make or break a new show, boosting ticket sales or sending down the final curtain.

  • I’ll never forget the time a straight colleague warned me, “Be careful what you wish for because someday you’ll just be another disenfranchised white guy,” clearly speaking to the LGBT community’s battle for civil rights. 

  • It’s been a dozen years since the world was introduced to the Crawley family, the fictional British nobles who call Downton Abbey home, and their colorful cast of servants. 

  • Former gay porn star Johnny Hazzard co-stars in gay family drama

  • A Nance, according to theatrical terminology of the 1930s, is a stock character meant to represent the stereotype of the “effeminate homosexual.” In Douglas Carter Beane's acclaimed new play “The Nance,” out gay actor Nathan Lane plays Chauncey Miles, who plays a variety of nance characters in a low rent burlesque house in late 1930s New York City. Chauncey is tired — he yearns for a more serious acting career. He's alone, lonely and embittered.

  • A movie about a wisecracking grandma and her teen granddaughter, racing around in a beat-up car to find $600 by nightfall. You might think it sounds like any number of mediocre road comedies out there, full of trite generational gags and sporting a sappy, all-is-forgiven ending.