lgbt history

  • This Week in LGBT History from Quist — May 21—27

    May 21, 1979 —Daniel White Sentenced for Killing Harvey Milk and Mayor Moscone

    After using the "Twinkie defense," White is acquitted of the first-degree murder charge, but is found guilty of the voluntary manslaughter of both victims. He is sentenced to serve seven and two-thirds years. Over 3,000 people rioted in what became known as the White Night Riots. Dozens were hospitalized.

  • This Week in LGBT History From Quist — May 7-14

    May 7, 1365 — Giovanni di Giovanni Killed for Sodomy

    The 15-year-old is publicly castrated and killed by a red-hot iron in his anus for admitting to having sex with multiple men. He is one of the youngest victims of the campaign against sodomy in Italy.

  • This Week in LGBT History from Quist — The Week of May 28 — June 3

    May 28, 1989 — Leather Pride Flag Debuted

    The flag was designed by Tony DeBlase. He first presented the design at the International Mister Leather event in Chicago, Illinois.

  • This Week in LGBT History from Quist Feb. 12-19

    San Fran Mayor Ordered Marriage Licenses Be Granted to Gay Couples. — Feb, 12, 2004

    Gavin Newsom makes the order to the City and County of San Francisco despite the lack of legal recognition by the state of California or the United States. Del Martin and Phyllis Lyons are issued a marriage license on this day.

  • This Week in LGBT History from Quist, March 12-19, 2014

    March 12, 1995 — Gay Couple Married in Cambodia

  • This Week in LGBT History, Feb. 26 to March 5

    Feb. 26, 1649Christina of Sweden Abdicates Throne

    Christina has "an insurmountable distaste for marriage [...and] for all the things that females talked about and did." Citing her wish not to marry, she resigns as Queen on this day.

  • Three Decades ago, AIDS Activists Set Up Camp in SF Plaza

    Thirty years ago this month, two San Francisco men, fed up with government inaction as AIDS decimated the gay community, chained themselves to a federal building within sight of City Hall.

  • Trans History Matters

    Amazon’s first hit show, “Transparent”, is a true groundbreaker in a lot of ways. It’s incredibly well written, and the characters are both believable and authentic, particularly transitioning 70-year-old retired college professor Maura Pfefferman, played by veteran character actor Jeffrey Tambor.

  • TV's Jimmy Olsen, Openly Gay, Dies at 87

    When Jack Larson died on Sept. 20 he left behind a legacy of film and theater for which he was rarely properly credited.

  • U. of Wyoming Houses LGBT Archive

    CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - The University of Wyoming is housing an archive dedicated to the history of the Rocky Mountains' lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

  • U.S. v. Windsor: One Year Later

    June 26 is the most historic date on the LGBT civil rights movement’s calendar. It is the day in 2003 when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that states could not enforce laws prohibiting same-sex adults from having intimate relations.

  • UK Finally Pardons Gay Computer Pioneer

    LONDON -- His code breaking prowess helped the Allies outfox the Nazis, his theories laid the foundation for the computer age, and his work on artificial intelligence still informs the debate over whether machines can think.

  • UN Annual Meeting: End LGBT Violence

    A dozen U.N. agencies have issued an unprecedented joint call for countries to end violence against gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people.

  • Uncovering the alleged LGBT connections in the JFK assassination

    In 1969, New Orleans District Attorney Jim Garrison prosecuted Clay Shaw for allegedly conspiring to kill President John F. Kennedy.

  • US Aims to Identify, Promote Historic LGBT Sites

    The National Park Service is launching an initiative to make places and people of significance to the history of lesbian, gay, transgender and bisexual Americans part of the national narrative.

  • US Embassy Mocks Russian Paper Over Fake Letter

    MOSCOW (AP) — The U.S. Embassy in Moscow has mocked a Russian daily that has accused Washington of conspiring to brand some Russian officials as gays, by correcting mistakes in a fake letter the newspaper mentioned as proof.

  • Was ‘Mary Poppins’ Author Bisexual?

    P.L. Travers, author of “Mary Poppins,” was born Helen Lyndon Goff on Aug. 9, 1899 in the city of Maryborough, in Queensland, Australia, (not in England, as many assume). She moved to England in 1924, and used the name P.L. Travers, an abbreviation of her pseudonym Pamela Lyndon Travers, which she used in her days as a dancer and Shakespearean actor on the Australian stage. Reportedly, her wealthy relatives did not approve of Travers performing, so, being independent-minded, she moved to England where she forged a career as a writer.

  • Welcome to Fairyland: New book of Miami’s early queer history

    Julio Capó Jr’s new book “Welcome to Fairyland: Queer Miami Before 1940” takes on the very difficult task of chronicling Miami’s queer history prior to 1940. Until now, little has been written about Miami’s gay history except perhaps a few sporadic pieces in LGBT publications from the past that have been published here.

  • What's Changed Since N.J. Gov. Jim McGreevey's 'Gay American' Speech 10 Years Ago

    (Speech in verbatim at the bottom of this story.) Ten years after he announced that he was a "gay American" and would resign from office after a scandal-plagued stint as New Jersey governor, Jim McGreevey is back in government, this time mostly as an evangelist for prison reform.

  • Where Do LGBT Americans Fit Into Nation's History?

    NEW YORK (AP) — Interior Secretary Sally Jewell will appear Friday at the Stonewall Inn, scene of the riots widely credited with starting the modern gay rights movement, to announce the National Park Service will begin marking places of significance to the history of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender Americans.