Broadway, Stage, and TV Star Entertains Saturday at Parker Playhouse

Less than two weeks after concluding a run as the EmCee in the Tony award-winning musical Cabaret, Alan Cumming is off and running again.

He is kicking off a worldwide concert tour with a show at Parker Playhouse in Fort Lauderdale, on Saturday, April 11, at 8 p.m.

In between these roles, you get to see the Scottish born stage, film and TV star every Sunday evening in his compelling role as Eli Gold in the CBS series “The Good Wife.” It’s a tenure that has earned him multiple Golden Globe, Emmy, SAG, and Critic’s Circle nominations.

Oh, and the busy lad is an author, too. Cumming’s New York Times best-selling memoir “Not My Father’s Son” has been chosen as the Palm Beach Book Festival’s Memoir Of The Year. So on an early Saturday afternoon, before his show at Parker, he will do a book signing at the Norton Gallery of Art in West Palm Beach.

“I do get time to rest and reflect, when I can I go to my little cocoon, a home in the Catskill Mountains, north of Manhattan,” he told SFGN. “I go there for one night, and it is I have relaxed there for a week.”

Another place for Cumming to chill is on long distance plane flights, where, he writes in his memoir, he is able to “shut out the rest of the world and focus on a good book.”

In his own book, Cumming shares that acting was his “salvation,” a break away from an abusive father and horrid relationship. “Acting is something I enjoy and I am good at, and what I like about it most is that it provokes, entertains, and challenges people.”

Cumming has faced challenges his entire life, but has emerged upon the American artistic landscape, showcasing his immense talents and extraordinary energy on stage and screen. Still, he remains an activist on causes that matter to the LGBT community.

When he discovered that Indiana’s governor signed an anti LGBT bill into law recently, he promptly expressed his outrage. “It’s kind of horrendous, and easy for all of us to become too complacent. We have to be vigilant. It is absolutely galling at how many other American states are now trying to replicate Indiana’s law.”

Cumming admits that a discussion about laws like the one in Indiana would never have made it to the dinner table as a child growing up in Scotland. He appreciates the world the way it is today, and his book is composed of vignettes comparing ‘then’ to ‘now.’

“The world is healthier with more equality and transparency,” he said.

He is passionate about it, and as an openly bisexual man, he has been that way about himself. Cumming married his husband, graphic artist Grant Shaffer, in the United Kingdom in 2007, and for good measure, again in New York, in 2012.

“My sexuality has never been black and white,” Cumming told Advocate last week, “it’s always been gray.” It is an understandable conundrum. Cumming spent 8 years married to actress Hilary Lyon, only to be followed with a 2-year partnership with another actress, Safron Burrows.

As supportive as Cumming was about the advances in same sex marriage, he was equally adamant that the LGBT community needs to still progress from within, that we are: “too selective with equality; that we have left the ‘T’ part behind a bit.” That won’t be the case this Saturday night in Lauderdale. Cumming’s show features Dina Martina, one of the most original drag performers working in America today. Tickets for the show are online at browardcenter.org, Parker Playhouse and Ticketmaster.

If you go, expect his show, “Alan Cumming: Uncut,” to be an unabashed and unadulterated pleasant night of deranged and exotic entertainment. Says the Los Angeles Times, “Cumming’s one man show unveils a naughty and comical visceral banter, balanced by kooky and mainstream songs.”

For myself, I am just hoping he doesn’t pull me onstage to do an impromptu dance with him, as he did last month in the Roundabout Theater in New York City.

“Oh, I will be seeing you next month in Fort Lauderdale,” I said.

“Fort Lauderdale,” Cumming replied, referencing the elderly population, “I won’t be there for another 60 years.” But in truth, he likes South Florida, “oh, there may be some older people,” he remarked, “but there is also a lot of youthful gay people.”

Nevertheless, two weeks later, Cumming will be receiving a Humanitarian Award in New York City from Safe Horizons, a not for profit group that empowers the victims of family and community violence to move from crisis to confidence. The cause is dear to his heart, and the central focus of his revealing memoir, “Not My Father’s Son.”

The memoir is a book that sheds light on Cumming’s struggle to find out who his real father was, but simultaneously illuminates the frightening side of child abuse by a parent. It was a consuming read, transparently sharing that as a child he suppressed humor and lived in fear.

Today, that is no longer the case. Today, fear is thrown to the wind as he parades on Broadway stages as the emcee of the world-renowned Kit Kat Club, while tweeting regularly at @alancumming.

A man of concerts and contrasts, who has gone from nervous breakdowns to international acclaim, Cumming is a performer worth seeing this Saturday, and it’s a lot closer than Wales, Ireland, New Zealand, or Australia, where this tour will also take him next month. Don’t try to book tickets for Sydney. They are already sold out.

BLOG COMMENTS POWERED BY DISQUS