OnlyFans built its brand on the backs of independent creators of adult content.

Now that it’s a multi-billion-dollar business, it’s kicking them to the curb — or at least tried to. Last week the website announced it would stop letting people post “sexually explicit content.” People would have been able to post anything on an OnlyFans page, like workout or barbeque videos.

But in a stunning reversal the company announced Wednesday it was suspending its decision to ban porn.

Starting Oct. 1, OnlyFans guidelines would have only allowed some nudes but nothing hyper-sexual. They never clarified what that would have meant.

JustFor.Fans (JFF) is a similar platform based in South Florida. Founder Dominic Ford says his company has no plans to ban porn, and welcomes content creators looking for a new home.

“Platforms like JFF provide a safe and stable income for sex workers,” Ford said. “Without it, sex workers will be forced back into unsafe environments, like the street. JustFor.Fans provides recurring, passive income to people who don't have that elsewhere.”

A report by Axios says that despite tens of millions of users, venture capitalists and so-called “mainstream” investors don’t want to buy into the company. “It certainly seems like [OnlyFans] is seeking investments from firms who won’t invest in adult [entertainment],” Ford says.

Adult entertainment is a big part of the South Florida community. Many stars work in Greater Fort Lauderdale at some point in their career, some of whom are represented by FabScout Model Management’s Howard Andrew. Like many others, he saw this as an attack on sex workers. “I do believe this is corporate America digging in their heels to shame the sex work industry and make sex work seem like it isn’t work.”

Between laws and corporate regulations, sex workers are constantly under attack. In 2015 Homeland Security raided Rentboy.com which hosted profiles from male escorts. Last year, Pornhub’s payment processors ended their service after allegations of child sex abuse materials on the site. This month, Rep. Ann Wagner (R-MO) asked the Department of Justice to investigate OnlyFans “...focusing on the prevalence of Child Sexual Abuse Material [CSAM] on the website and the specific actions OnlyFans takes to ensure minors are protected from exploitation.”

The platform’s popularity exploded during the pandemic when many sex workers couldn’t make studio productions and took their talents directly to their fans. Also in 2020 some mainstream Hollywood stars including Bella Thorne and Tyler Posey started their own pages on OnlyFans and were accused of taking attention and money away from the lesser-known members.

FabScout’s Andrew thinks OnlyFans’ new business model would have worked, at least in the short run. Even though the decision has been reversed he hopes content creators will check out JFF.

“I do believe the platform is much easier and cleaner to use and more model friendly.”

He also reminds people that sex work is work that needs to be respected and done in a safe space.

“Working with these people, sex work is often harder than a standard 9-5 job, this is 24/7.”


BLOG COMMENTS POWERED BY DISQUS