Alan Cumming is used to being labeled — Tony- and Emmy-winning actor, author, singer, the list goes on and on — but just don’t accuse him of acting his age.

The Scottish-American performer has performed in concert halls across the globe, including the Sydney Opera House, London Palladium, Hollywood Bowl and Carnegie Hall. He’s played God, the Devil, Hitler, the Pope, a teleporting superhero, Hamlet, all the parts in “Macbeth,” and the enigmatic “Emcee” in “Cabaret” in the West End and on Broadway.      

He’s back on the road and using the opportunity to comment on the stodgy stereotypes society places on the more mature generation. And, he’ll be singing and dancing and talking all about it at two South Florida appearances.

“I am getting older,” he said in a phone interview, his highland brogue seeming softer than previous conversations. “I enjoy where I am right now [he just turned 57 in January] and feel like I connect to young people, people in their twenties. I feel I have some sort of peer relationship, but I have been around the block a few times and have some wisdom to give back, too.”

Cumming took a few minutes to reflect on the cyclical nature of fashion, musical tastes, and the other arts: “I do enjoy seeing the patterns that sort of happen and the cyclic nature, like seeing the same show, but with different costumes. Even today, we were talking about podcasts, for me that’s what I used to do 20 odd years ago when I did radio plays for the BBC.” 

He had plenty of time to reflect on the cycle of life and plan this latest outing while quarantined during the early months of the pandemic when most theaters and performing venues were shuttered indefinitely.

“I loved it. I was in my place in the Catskill Mountains, me and my husband and my dogs,” Cumming explained. “For so long leading up to the pandemic, I wanted a time to just spend time up in the mountains and stand back from life. Obviously, it was a terrible time, but the situation couldn’t have been any better. It changed how I think about my work, my time, how much I value my quiet time. It was a beautiful sort of rebooting of my life.” 

In addition to creating this show, he finished a book, “On Baggage: Tales from a Fully Packed Life,” which was featured at Miami Book Fair International last November. His Apple TV+ series “Schmigadoon!” with Kristen Chenoweth was greenlit for a second season and he still found time to film two movies. 

When we spoke two months ago, Cumming had just returned from his native Scotland, where he performed in “Burn,” a brand-new piece of dance theater that challenged the “biscuit tin” image of Scotland’s national bard, Robert Burns.

“I’m still recovering from dancing for two weeks,” he mildly complained. “Most dancers I know would have ended their [dancing] careers 30 years ago, but why not? I wanted to tell the story. Any artist wants to tell the story, and as a dancer, you use your body to tell the story. I’d never done a show like that.” 

Many 57-year-olds are focused on those bucket list items they have yet to experience, but not Cumming: “I don’t like the notion of a bucket list. If you want to do things, you should do them. You shouldn’t bank them up in case you’re going to die.”


Alan Cumming will appear at the Kravis Center in West Palm Beach on Thursday, March 31 at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $25 at Kravis.org. He’ll repeat the show at the Parker, 707 N.E. 8th St. in Fort Lauderdale, on Friday, April 1 at 8 p.m. Tickets start at $48 at ParkerPlayhouse.com.

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