Fort Meade Army Reserves lawyer Deirdre Hendrick (left) and Navy Petty Officer First Class Alice Ashton (right). Photos via Facebook.

Fort Meade Army Reserves lawyer Deirdre Hendrick and Navy Petty Officer First Class Alice Ashton are two transgender women working to keep trans people in the military.

On April 12, the ban on transgender individuals entering the military went into effect. Hendrick and Ashtonjoined transgender military members advocacy group Service Members, Partners, Allies for Respect and Tolerance for All (SPART*A) tohelp 18 trans military members keep their jobs over the course of a month leading up to the 12th, according to Military Times. 

“I said, ‘Look, these people are going to get kicked out if they don’t get this fixed by this date. I feel morally obligated to help them,’” Hendrick told the Capital Gazette in Maryland.

Service members had to get a diagnosis of gender dysphoria before April 12 to be grandfathered into the military. However, it wasn't clear the ban would go into effect until March 12 and Military Times reported that it typically takes three months to receive a diagnosis.Hendrick and Ashton helped as many people get their diagnoses as they could, but are still worried for the future of trans people in the military.