In a series of posts on Instagram, Charlie Carver, best known for his roles on MTV's "Teen Wolf" and HBO's "The Leftovers," came out as gay, saying he's never "really ever been in" the closet.

In one of his Instagram posts Monday, Carver, 27, posted a picture of a sign with the quote "Be who you needed when you were younger."

Pt 1: “Be who you needed when you were younger”. About a year ago, I saw this photo while casually scrolling through my Instagram one morning. I’m not one for inspirational quotes, particularly ones attributed to “Mx Anonymous”- something mean in me rebukes the pithiness of proverbs, choosing to judge them as trite instead of possibly-generally-wise, resonant, or helpful. And in the case of the good ol’ Anonymous kind, I felt that there was something to be said for the missing context. Who wrote or said the damn words? Why? And to/for who in particular? Nonetheless, I screen-capped the picture and saved it. It struck me for some reason, finding itself likeable enough to join the ranks of the “favorites” album on my phone. I’d see it there almost daily, a small version of it next to my other “favorites”; I’d see it every time I checked into the gym, pulled up a picture of my insurance cards, my driver’s license.... Important Documents. And over the course of about-a-year, it became clear why the inspirational photo had called out to me. As a young boy, I knew I wanted to be an actor. I knew I wanted to be a lot of things! I thought I wanted to be a painter, a soccer player, a stegosaurus... But the acting thing stuck. It was around that age that I also knew, however abstractly, that I was different from some of the other boys in my grade. Over time, this abstract “knowing” grew and articulated itself through a painful gestation marked by feelings of despair and alienation, ending in a climax of saying three words out loud: “I am gay”. I said them to myself at first, to see how they felt. They rang true, and I hated myself for them. I was twelve. It would take me a few years before I could repeat them to anyone else, in the meantime turning the phrase over and over in my mouth until I felt comfortable and sure enough to let the words pour out again, this time to my family...

A photo posted by Charlie Carver (@charliecarver) on

"As a young boy, I knew I wanted to be an actor. I knew I wanted to be a lot of things!" Carver wrote to his 754,000 followers. "It was around that age that I also knew, however abstractly, that I was different from some of the other boys in my grade. Over time, this abstract 'knowing' grew...ending in a climax of saying three words out loud: 'I am gay.'"

Carver added his relationship with his sexuality became "more complicated" when he started acting.

"At nineteen, I started working in Hollywood. It was a dream come true," he continued. "Coupled with the overwhelming sense of excitement was an equally overwhelming feeling of dread-- I would 'have to' bisect myself into two halves, a public and private persona, the former vigilantly monitored, censored, and sterilized of anything that could reveal how I self-identified in the latter."

He also said he was worried about coming out would impact the roles he would be given, adding, "I hadn't really ever been in."

"I tried to live as authentically as I've known how to, as a gay guy, since that concept became available to me, only once or twice intentionally dodging the ever ill-timed question with the subtext that might have as well read 'ARE YOU GAY???'" he wrote. "I've lived 'out,' not feeling the need to announce so. I was comfortably out in my private life. And for a time, that was enough."

He continued: "Let the record show this-- I self-identify as gay. Does that really matter anymore? As a young man, I needed a young man in Hollywood to say that -- and without being a dick about it, I owe it to myself, more than anything, to be who I needed when I was younger."

Carver played Ethan on "Teen Wolf" along with his twin brother Max Carver, who played Aiden. The twins also appeared on the first season of "The Leftovers."

In his posts on Instagram, Carver also commented on his brother, writing, "And let the record show my twin brother is just as cool for being straight."


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