You want stuff. A nice wardrobe, say. Decent dishes, nice lamps, food and drink.

Somewhere to relax and a place to sleep. You want stuff, and a home to put that stuff in, but that generally takes money, honey, and it usually comes from a j-o-b. Fear not, though: help is on the way with "Working Girls: Trixie & Katya's Guide to Professional Womanhood" by Trixie Mattel and Katya Zamolodchikova.

If you must work, at least you should find a job that fits you, right? So grab Trixie and Katya's guide and start with the career aptitude test. You might be surprised – or you might "qualify for 0 percent APR financing."

Next, think about what you really want to do with your life. How about a career of service as a cleaner who removes "the carnage of lowly grifters, criminals, and monsters"? You might rather hang out with kids as a nanny, or be a "tipped laborer."

Remember, always tip the waitstaff.

You could work in publishing, "big tech," financing, whatever you choose, always dress for the job. If that means drag, "grab a wig, some fabric, and two lashes... and poof!" You're ready to hire.

But wait. First, you'll have to go through an interview, so think about the skills you want to showcase, then "reel them in" with thoughtful answers to those silly interview questions. Once you've got a job offer in hand, be forearmed with the handy guide to the types of coworkers you might encounter. Remember: work is not like college, where you can avoid "germs, viruses, and nonessential enzymes named Carol from Accounts Receivable."

Know how to ask for a raise (do you even deserve one?). Be glad if they ask you to do a Zoom meeting from home. Know how to manage your time, know when it's time to leave your job, and know how to be graceful if it wasn't exactly your idea. Learn to recognize work scams. And then prepare for retirement. Yeah, you do deserve that.

It should be crystal clear by merely looking at the cover of "Working Girls: Trixie & Katya's Guide to Professional Womanhood" that this book pokes plenty of fun in the world of work. It's funny, saucy, and over-the-top... and it actually includes surprisingly decent advice, too.

Just be willing to read between the lines, although that shouldn't be a problem. Readers who are old enough to handle the theme of this book should be smart enough to know when authors Trixie Mattel and Katya Zamolodchikova aren't exactly trying for Dear Abby here; there's an overload of snark and sarcasm in these pages, and it's in neon. Still, the fact remains that there are usable nuggets inside this book – on working from home, getting along with coworkers, asking for more money, and how to quit.

Bring your sense of humor when you tackle this book, but bring your resume, too. "Working Girls: Trixie & Katya's Guide to Professional Womanhood" is funny and useful, and, well, you want it.

"Working Girls: Trixie & Katya's Guide to Professional Womanhood" by Trixie Mattel and Katya Zamolodchikova

c.2022, Plume $28 224 pages


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