Thanksgiving

  • 5 Thanksgiving Cooking Tips From Across The Pond

    (EDGE) Thanksgiving has gradually gained attention on British shores. While they're keen to kick off the holiday season, many Brits are in need of some cooking guidance. There's no denying that Thanksgiving is known for its indulgent pecan pies, colorful side sauces and gigantic turkey platters, however there's more to the festive feast than the well-known American classics. 

  • Cruising on Pied Piper’s Post-Thanksgiving Cruise

    I’ve always looked at those pictures from the all-gay cruises and thought, “I wish they had these when I was younger.” The ads are all filled with guys with perfect bodies, perfect abs, perfect pecs, and perfect, unlined faces and, let’s just say I’m not any of those. 

  • Food: Dining out for Thanksgiving

    Sometimes the only thing you want to make for Thanksgiving is a reservation. If you prefer not to slave over a hot oven, there are a number of options, at all price points, for dining out. Do your own version of the Turkey Trot and head to one of these places for a hassle-free Thanksgiving dinner.

  • Food: Trailer Trash Thanksgiving

    I wouldn’t say my family was trailer trash, we never actually lived in a trailer, but my mother sure cooked like we were. She had every cookbook put out by a food company. Campbell’s, Kraft, Birdseye, Betty Crocker. Her cookbook shelf was like a directory of Fortune 500 companies. Her “secret” chocolate cake recipe was a box of Duncan Hine’s mix and a can of Campbell’s tomato soup.

  • Major Storm Expected To Snarl Thanksgiving Holiday Travel In Northeast

    (CNN) -- If you're heading to the Northeast for Thanksgiving, you might want to get an early start.

  • Op-Ed: The Sun Is Rising On Gay America

    The LGBT community in America has much to be thankful for in 2018. As an example, be sure you take a moment and look at the article by Chris Johnson of the Washington Blade in this week’s paper. 

  • Rick's Reviews: Package Deal

    A few weeks ago, I wrote a column suggesting some alternative ideas for Thanksgiving, both places to dine out and restaurants that were offering entire meals to go. If you prefer not to cook, there’s another option; prepared holiday meals from grocery stores. Most chains now offer entire Thanksgiving meals which can be picked up fully-cooked and merely heated up before serving. Here’s a run-down on what’s available locally. Most require little more than 24-hours-notice. If you snoozed and didn’t order in time for Thanksgiving, they’re also available for Christmas or New Year’s Day. The prices indicated are for packages that serve 6-8, unless otherwise noted.

  • Screen Savor: Holidays Are Hell

    Just when you thought you’d seen everything in terms of Thanksgiving holiday movies, along comes the dark comedy “The Oath” (Roadside Attractions), actor Ike Barinholtz’s feature length debut as writer and director. While it may not be on par with Jodie Foster’s “Home for The Holidays”, it does have its charms and a timely message.

  • Thanksgiving Day Fast Facts

    (CNN) Here's a look at Thanksgiving Day, celebrated in the United States on the fourth Thursday in November. In 2018, Thanksgiving is on November 22.

    Facts:
    AAA forecasts 54.3 million Americans will travel 50 miles or more for Thanksgiving in 2018.

    According to the USDA, 245 million turkeys were projected to be raised in the United States in 2017.

    9.05 million barrels of cranberries were projected to be produced in the United States in 2017.

    The president traditionally receives a turkey in a ceremony at the White House a few days before Thanksgiving Day. President Harry S. Truman started the tradition and President George H. W. Bush was the first to pardon the bird and not eat it.

    Timeline:
    Fall 1621 - The first Thanksgiving is observed in Plymouth. A good harvest leads Massachusetts Governor William Bradford to plan a festival to give thanks. Around 90 Native Americans attend.

    1789 - President George Washington issues a proclamation naming November 26 a day of national thanksgiving.

    There was no national Thanksgiving Day for several years, but many states had Thanksgiving holidays.

    October 3, 1863 - President Abraham Lincoln proclaims the last Thursday in November as a national day of thanksgiving.

    1939 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt moves Thanksgiving Day one week earlier to boost the Christmas shopping season.

    1941 - Congress rules that the fourth Thursday in November will be observed as Thanksgiving Day and a federal legal holiday.