This Week in LGBT History from Quist — The Week of May 28 — June 3

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May 28, 1989 — Leather Pride Flag Debuted

The flag was designed by Tony DeBlase. He first presented the design at the International Mister Leather event in Chicago, Illinois.

Greg Kabel

May 29, 2008 — N.Y. Becomes 1st State to Recognize Out-of-State Gay Marriages

As a result of the ruling in Martinez v Monroe County, Governor David Paterson signs an executive order mandating that state agencies recognize same-sex marriages performed in other US states equally under the law.

May 30, 1593 — Christopher Marlowe, English Poet & Playwright, Killed in Bar Fight

Christopher Marlowe is famous for writing works such as Doctor Faustus and Edward II, the latter of which dealt with the life of an English king who was rumored to be gay. At twenty-nine, Marlowe was accused of writing papers supporting atheism, a charge Frances Kett, a Cambridge graduate student, had recently been burned for in 1589. At a tavern in Deptford, he got in a fight with Ingram Friezer, and Marlowe died from a blow to the skull.

May 31, 2012 — Same-Sex Marriage Approved by Conservative Jewish Movement

The Committee on Jewish Law and Standards issues a ruling to allow clergy to perform same-sex marriages. Two model wedding ceremonies are approved, in addition to guidelines for a same-sex divorce.

June 1, 2003 — Same-sex Marriage Legalized in Belgium

Belgium becomes the second country to allow same-sex marriages in 2003 (after the Netherlands). Same-sex couples have the same rights as opposite-sex couples.

June 2, 2000 — Gay & Lesbian Pride Month Declared by President

President Bill Clinton issues a proclamation recognizing the lasting contributions, and continuing struggles, of gay and lesbian people. He also calls on Congress to pass hate crimes legislation.

June 3, 2007 — Wedding of Kanako Otsuji

The first openly lesbian politician in Japan holds a public ceremony with her partner of four years, Maki Kimura, despite the lack of legal recognition in Japan. The ceremony is held the month before Otsuji will face re—election. The public wedding took place in a park during an HIV prevention festival in front of 1,000 people.

 All of the information above has been reprinted with permission from Quist, an LGBT mobile history app that can be found on iOS and Android devices. Visit HYPERLINK "http://www.quistapp.com/"www.Quistapp.com for more information. The app was created by Sarah Prager and launched in July of 2013.


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